Saints and Stones: St. Tredwell's Chapel
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The remains of St. Tredwell's Chapel consists of late medieval walls (probably 12th Century) deliberately built over Iron Age remains, including an underground tunnel leading to a circular building or broch. The thick walls of the chapel and records of tracery work indicate an important and well-founded establishment.

St. Tredwell’s Chapel, which is dedicated to St. Tredwell (also known as St. Triduana), was one of the most visited pilgrimage places in Orkney. St. Tredwell was one of the saints associated with Pictland and is said to have traveled north with St. Boniface in 710 A.D. King Nechtan fell in love with her and praised her beautiful eyes. To spare him from temptation and to preserve her chastity, she is said to have torn her eyes out and presented them to him skewered on a thorn branch. Waters associated with her, such as the Loch of St Tredwell, were thought to cure eye diseases.

About St. Tredwell's Chapel

Papa Westray, Orkney: St. Tredwell's Chapel
Canmore: Papa Westray, St Tredwell's Chapel
Orkneyjar: St Tredwell's Loch, Papay
Wikipedia: Triduana

Journey to St. Tredwell's Chapel

St. Tredwell's Chapel is located on a small peninsula in the Loch of Tredwell in the southeast side of the isle of Papa Westray.

Ordnance Survey Map (HY49645088)

Visitors Information

Visitors information for St. Tredwell's Chapel may be found at the geograph.org.uk website. General tourism information for Papa Westray may be found on the Papa Westray, Orkney website. General tourist information for Orkney as a whole may be found on the Visit Orkney website.

Additional Photos of St. Tredwell's Chapel

St. Tredwell's Chapel in Loch of Tredwell
Approaching St. Tredwell's Chapel
Remains of St. Tredwell's Chapel
Remains of St. Tredwell's Chapel
Remains of Broch Under St. Tredwell's Chapel


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