Saints and Stones: St. Augustine's Abbey
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St. Augustine's Abbey was founded in 598 A.D. following St. Augustine's successful mission to Kent to begin the conversion of the English to Christianity. King Ethelbert, who happened to be married to a Christian, Bertha, gave Augustine a site to build a monastery for the monks who had accompanied him from Italy. Already standing on the site were three Saxon churches, dedicated respectively to Saints Pancras, Peter and Paul, and Mary. The Saxon-phase remains of the church -- the Porticus of St. Gregory at the far east of the site -- are still visible; however, the other two churches were rebuilt by the Normans into one building. In 978 A.D., a new larger building was dedicated by Archbishop Dunstan to the Saints Peter, Paul, and Augustine. By 1100, all remains of the original Anglo-Saxon building had disappeared. On July 30, 1538, the abbey's fate was sealed when it fell to the dissolution of Henry VIII.

Today, the the ruins of the abbey, covering a substantial area east of Canterbury Cathedral, are a World Heritage Site. Notable grave markers are on site indicating the location of the first four Archbishops.

About St. Augustine's Abbey

English Heritage: St. Augustine's Abbey
World Heritage Site Page: Canterbury Cathedral, St. Augustine's Abbey, and St. Martin's Church
New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia: Abbey of St. Augustine
Sacred Destinations: St. Augustine's Abbey
Wikipedia: St. Augustine's Abbey
Wikipedia: Augustine of Canterbury
New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Augustine of Canterbury
Wikipedia: Dunstan
New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia: St. Dunstan
Wikipedia: List of Archbishops of Canterbury
Wikipedia: Benedictines

Journey to St. Augustine's Abbey

St. Augustine's Abbey is located on Monastery Street in the city of Canterbury in Kent in southeast England.

Ordnance Survey Map (TR1535657807)

Visitors Information

Visitors information for St. Augustine's Abbey may be found at the English Heritage website. General tourism information for Canterbury may be found at the Visit Canterbury website. General tourism information for Kent, visit the Visit Kent website.

Additional Photos of St. Augustine's Abbey

Road Sign for St. Augustine's Abbey
Map Showing St. Augustine's Abbey in Relation to Other Canterbury Sites
Descriptive Sign at St. Augustine's Abbey
First View of St. Augustine's Abbey
Surviving North Wall of the Nave of the Norman Church, St. Augustine's Abbey
Remains of the Ethelbert Tower, St. Augustine's Abbey
Plaque Marking the Entrance to the Original Church, St. Augustine's Abbey
Site of St. Augustine's Grave, St. Augustine's Abbey
Site of Grave of St. Laurence of Canterbury, St. Augustine's Abbey
Site of Grave of St. Mellitus, St. Augustine's Abbey
Site of Grave of St. Justus, St. Augustine's Abbey
Site of Grave of St. Theodore of Tarsus, St. Augustine's Abbey
Porticus of St. Gregory, Part of the Original Anglo-Saxon church, St. Augustine's Abbey
Remains of the Church of Sts. Peter and Paul (Foreground), the Original Church on This Site, St. Augustine's Abbey
The Site of the Cloister, St. Augustine's Abbey
Remains of the Crypt Below Abbot Wulfric's Rotunda, St. Augustine's Abbey
Remains of the Crypt Below the High Altar, St. Augustine's Abbey
Surviving Medieval Tiles, St. Augustine's Abbey
Modern Tomb Marking the Grave of Anglo-Saxon King Eadbald (d.640), St. Augustine's Abbey
7th Century St. Pancras Church, the Only Standing Remains of the Anglo-Saxon Church, St. Augustine's Abbey
Original Roman Bricks, St. Pancras Church, St. Augustine's Abbey
Modern Museum at St. Augustine's Abbey Site


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