Saints and Stones: Lastingham
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There has been a church on this site since the mid-7th Century (c.654 A.D.) when St. Cedd, formerly a student of St. Aidan at Lindisfarne, and his brother Caelin founded a monastery here.

St. Cedd became its first Abbot and ruled until his death in 664 A.D. Another brother, St. Chad, who also was a student of St. Aidan at Lindisfarne, became abbot of the monastery after St. Cedd's death.

The original wooden church was replaced by a stone structure ca.725 A.D. Some of the original stones may still be found in the crypt of the present-day church. The monastery was destroyed by Viking invasions in the 9th and 10th Centuries. In 1078, Abbot Stephen of Whitby and several Benedictine monks went to Lastingham to rebuild the ruined church. They built a crypt as a shrine to St. Cedd over the place where it was thought that he was buried. A new abbey church was also started but abandoned in 1088 when the monks moved to York.

A parish church was established in 1228 A.D. Through the years, different sections of the present church were built. The Norman tower was added in the 15th Century.

About Lastingham

Lastingham Church Website
Britannia: Lastingham Abbey
Wikipedia: Lastingham
Wikipedia: Cedd
Wikipedia: Chad of Mercia

Journey to Lastingham

Lastingham Church is located 35 miles from York near Kirbymoorside off the A170 in North Yorkshire, England.

Ordnance Survey Map (SE7274790415)

Visitors Information

Visitors information may be found at the Lastingham Church website. General tourist information is at the Welcome to Yorkshire website.

Additional Photos of Lastingham

Reader Board at St. Mary Lastingham Church
St. Mary Lastingham Church
St. Mary Lastingham Church
St. Mary Lastingham Church Altar
Sign for St. Cedd's Crypt, St. Mary Lastingham Church
St. Cedd's Crypt, St. Mary Lastingham Church
Viking Tombstone in Crypt, St. Mary Lastingham Church
Saxon Cross Stones in Crypt, St. Mary Lastingham Church
St. Cedd's Crypt, St. Mary Lastingham Church
St. Cedd Stained-Glass Window, St. Mary Lastingham Church
St. Chad Stained-Glass Window, St. Mary Lastingham Church
St. Mary Lastingham Church


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