Saints and Stones: Dunfermline Abbey
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Dunfermline Abbey occupies the site of the ancient chancel and transepts of a large medieval Benedictine abbey, which was sacked in 1560 during the Scottish Reformation and permitted to fall into disrepair. Part of the old abbey church continued in use at that time and some parts of the abbey infrastructure still remain to this day.

The Abbey has a very long history dating back to ca.800 A.D. when a community of Culdees built the first Christian Church at Dunfermline.

The Benedictine Abbey of the Holy Trinity and St Margaret, was founded in 1128 by King David I of Scotland, but the monastic establishment was based on an earlier foundation dating back to 1072 when, by invitation from King Malcolm and Queen Margaret, Benedictines from Canterbury came to Scotland to found a Priory Church. The Kent monastery supplied Dunfermline's first monks. During its heyday, the church was an important center of pilgrimage for the cult of St. Margaret.

Dunfermline Abbey is one of Scotland's most important cultural sites and has received more of Scotlandís royal dead than any other place in the kingdom, excepting Iona. The abbey church is famous as the mausoleum of some of Scotlandís great kings and queens. They include Queen Margaret (later canonised as St. Margaret), David I, and Robert the Bruce.

About Dunfermline Abbey

Dunfermline Abbey Website
Historic Scotland: Dunfermline Abbey and Palace
New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia: Abbey of Dunfermline
Undiscovered Scotland: Dunfermline Abbey & Palace
Wikipedia: Dunfermline Abbey
Wikipedia: Saint Margaret of Scotland

Journey to Dunfermline Abbey

Dunfermline Abbey is located in the city of Dunfermline in Fife, Scotland. Approaching from the south and west, the Abbey is easily picked out in the skyline but traffic systems in Dunfermline City Center do not make it too easy to reach. Check the Abbey's website
for detailed instructions.

Ordnance Survey Map (NT0889587289)

Visitors Information

Visitors information for Dunfermline Abbey may be found at the Historic Scotland Dunfermline Abbey and Palace website. General tourist information may be found at the Fife website.

Additional Photos of Dunfermline Abbey

Approaching the Church at Dunfermline Abbey
The Church at Dunfermline Abbey
The Church at Dunfermline Abbey
The Church at Dunfermline Abbey Showing the Exterior of the Nave
Sign for Chapel of St. Margaret, Dunfermline Abbey
Remains of Chapel of St. Margaret, Dunfermline Abbey
SE Entrance to the Church Used by Monks, Dunfermline Abbey
The Church Nave Looking West, Dunfermline Abbey
Original Painted Ceiling in the North Aisle of the Nave, Dunfermline Abbey
Tomb of Robert the Bruce Inside Church, Dunfermline Abbey
Close-Up of Stained Class Window Featuring Robert the Bruce Inside Church, Dunfermline Abbey
Close-Up of Stained Glass Window in the Church Showing the Marriage of King Malcom and Margaret, Dunfermline Abbey
The Annunciation Stone, Dunfermline Abbey
One of Many Descriptive Signs in the Gatehouse Exhibition Area, Dunfermline Abbey
The Royal Palace Guesthouse, Dunfermline Abbey
The Royal Palace Guesthouse, Dunfermline Abbey
Descriptive Sign About the Refectory, Dunfermline Abbey
The Remains of the Three Floors of the Refectory, Dunfermline Abbey
The Bottom Two Floors of the Refectory, Dunfermline Abbey
The Great West Window of the Refectory, Dunfermline Abbey
Leaving Dunfermline Abbey

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